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DREAMJOB job summit coming to Ford Field in June

If you're in the professional job market, Ford Field is the place to be on June 13. After the interview, tour downtown workspaces, take part in a networking event, and even go to a Tigers game.

Excerpt:

"More than 80 Michigan employers from across the state will seek to fill more than 800 positions through an innovative matchmaking format that pairs qualified candidates with available job openings. Each employer will be stationed in its own booth for walk-ups and will have private space for interviews with candidates who have been pre-screened for the invitation-only matchup.

A comprehensive national advertising campaign, along with coordinated efforts with universities, associations and other talent resources will be mounted to attract resumes from qualified candidates. Jobs will be posted to an event-specific web portal – to be announced in coming weeks -- where candidates will be able to view and apply for one or more positions...

Participating companies include Quicken Loans, Whirlpool, Bosch, Lear, Delphi, Nissan, McCann Erickson, Roush, and Microsoft. These and other companies are seeking candidates for positions in a wide range of fields, including but not limited to: engineering, design, project management, supply chain management, finance, operations, sales, marketing and software development."

More here

Detroit companies get brand exposure at SXSW festival

It's too early to say yet, but the brand exposure for Metro Detroit companies, plus the MEDC's booth at SXSW, could pay big dividends in terms of sales and attracting more young professionals to Michigan.

Excerpt:

"The crush of people, brands and bands at the  South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Texas, creates brand exposure, and this year Detroit companies, musicians, attorneys and advertising agencies were there to capitalize on the opportunity...

Joe McClure, co-owner of Detroit-based  McClure's Pickles, said he was asked by San Francisco-based Internet lodging site  Airbnb  to provide a palette, 60 cases, of its Bloody Mary mix to serve during SXSW for free....

Leslie Hornung, senior vice president of marketing, communications  and public relations for the  Michigan Economic Development Corp., said the MEDC spent about $200,000 from its business attraction campaign to have a booth on the conference floor during the technology-focused days at SXSW. 

Hornung said more than 1,000 young professionals visited the MEDC exhibit, many of whom were interested in learning about working in Detroit."

More here.

Michigan has one of nation's largest unemployment rate drops in January

The job outlook is looking better all the time. Michigan fared better in its drop in the unemployment rate than most of the U.S., with the rate dropping .5% from Dec. 2013 to Jan. 2014, and 1.1% year-over-year.

Excerpt:

"The jobless rate fell significantly in 19 states, with the biggest declines in Louisiana, Michigan and Tennessee. Louisiana's slid to 4.9% from 5.4%; Michigan's, to 7.8% from 8.3%..."

More here.

Forecast 2022: Where the nation's best jobs will be

Employment sector trends are mapped out in this interesting article that forecasts where the nation's plum jobs will be. By 2022, the creative class will become an increasingly larger share of the job market in Metro Detroit.

Excerpt:

"...Between 2012 and 2022, the U.S. will add 15.6 million new jobs, according to BLS projections, with the overall workforce growing by 10.8 percent from 145 to 161 million. Of these, 5.6 million will be high-wage, creative class positions. The creative class will grow by 12.5 percent, the highest rate of all groups...

By 2022, blue-collar jobs will make up less and less of the workforce in the old industrial heartland – 19 percent in Buffalo; 21 percent in Pittsburgh; and 21 percent in Detroit."

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MEDC to showcase Michigan's appeal for entrepreneurs, creatives at SxSW trade show

If you're an entrepreneur or creative, the annual SxSW festival is where it's at. The MEDC and other Michigan universities and organizations will be there in a bid to attract talent to relocate the Great Lakes State.

Excerpt:

"This is a timely and dynamic opportunity to meet and talk face-to-face with entrepreneurs and talented, creative people from around the world and persuade them to locate to Michigan to work and start a business," said Michael Finney, president of MEDC, the state's marketing arm and lead advocate for business development, including fostering tourism, film production, and digital-media projects and overall economic growth...

"Our goal at 'South by Southwest' is to elevate Michigan in the minds of the preeminent players redefining the business prospects derived from the confluence of media, technology, creators and consumer trends," said Finney. "And, of course, the 'Pure Michigan' brand creates a positive impression about quality of life in our state."

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New Economy Initiative receives $33M in funding for new entrepreneurial, workforce programs

A new round of funding is set to go towards entrepreneurial and workforce re-training efforts in the Detroit area.

Excerpt:

"The New Economy Initiative's goal is to return greater Detroit to global prominence in innovation and entrepreneurship, and the effort's organizers said Monday it is moving closer to accomplishing what it set out to do, with the help of $33.25 million in new funding from 10 foundations.

The NEI, a project of the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, announced Monday that the funding will help support its efforts over the next three years, after awarding $76 million in grants in its first round of funding. That money helped fuel the work of some 35,000 entrepreneurs, who created more than 675 new companies and 8,000 new jobs in southeast Michigan, according to NEI organizers."

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Immigrants seen as way to shore up Detroit economy

Detroit may once again become the go-to city for highly-skilled immigrants.

Excerpt:

"For Detroit, a city that has watched a population in free fall, officials have a new antidote: immigrants.

Gov. Rick Snyder of Michigan on Thursday announced plans to seek federal help in bringing 50,000 immigrants to the bankrupt city over five years as part of a visa program aimed at those with advanced degrees or exceptional abilities in science, business or the arts...

Mr. Snyder said demand already exists for experts in fields like engineering, technology and health care. And he noted that Michigan colleges and universities are home to tens of thousands of international students — many of whom, he said, ought not depart after graduation."

More here.

How do you build an innovative, entrepreneurial community?

Anchor institutions are good. A well-developed community of small startups with young entrepreneurs is also good. A healthy mix of both seems to be best. But the devil is the details.
 
Excerpt:
 
"The study essentially argues that there is no one-size-fits-all solution to creating an innovative tech economy. Though civic boosters love to tout single-solution policies — by focusing on attracting one major tech firm, or by bolstering their start-up ecology — a mix of both approaches may be far more effective and prudent."
 
Read the rest here.
 
 

Automakers go head-on with Silicon Valley to recruit talent

As cars become increasingly software-driven, the automakers are recasting themselves as promising venues for software engineers.

Excerpt:

"U.S. automakers have embarked on an ambitious drive to hire software "codaholics," an effort that is increasingly pitting Detroit against its technology partners in Silicon Valley...

Four years after a sweeping industry restructuring that included massive job cuts, Ford and its U.S. rivals need to hire thousands of engineers at a time when software is playing a much more prominent role in vehicle design than even a few years ago.

Millions of lines of computer code increasingly govern core vehicle functions like braking and air-conditioning. Electronic parts including sensors and microcontrollers, used in laptop computers and smartphones, are the backbone of such vehicles.

The shift has General Motors Co, Ford and Chrysler Group LLC vying for a new kind of talent — engineers with software, electronic and computer network skills — that has typically ignored Detroit...."

More here.


At Maker Faire, anything flies

A Cloud Bean, an X-Wing, and a dining-table sized version of the Operation game were just a few of the don't-miss attractions at last weekend's Maker Faire at the Henry Ford. But if you did miss it, check out these cool images.

Next-gen workers concerned with resource conservation, more humanistic outlook

Organizations and employers may want to take note of this interesting piece in the Miami Herald. Will the newest generation of workers expect even more socially responsible employers to choose from?

Excerpt:

"Drew Miller clearly remembers the day his father was laid off.

Miller, now 25, was a freshman at an Ohio college, full of hope and ready to take on the world. But here was this “red flag … a big wake-up call,” he says. The prosperous years of childhood were over, and his future was likely to be bumpier than he’d expected.

Across the country, others of Miller’s generation heard that same wake-up call as the Great Recession set in. But would it change them? And would the impact last?

The full effect won’t be known for a while, of course. But a new analysis of a long-term survey of high school students provides an early glimpse at ways their attitudes shifted in the first years of this most recent economic downturn.

Among the findings: Young people showed signs of being more interested in conserving resources and a bit more concerned about their fellow human beings."

More here.

Help Wanted: NY Times sees tech workers moving to Detroit

West coasties are coming to Detroit, on the heels of a tech-hiring boomlet in the auto industry.

Excerpt:

"After graduating from the University of Michigan in 1998, Brian Mulloy followed the path of many of his classmates, fleeing his home state for a job in a bustling city. But after 10 years of working in technology start-ups in San Francisco, he has returned as founder of a company in Detroit’s budding technology sector..

Mr. Mulloy is part of a group of workers that Detroit is suddenly hungry for — software developers and information technology specialists who can create applications for the next generation of connected vehicles."

More here.


Surprise! The creative class is thriving in Michigan

In this Bridge Magazine column, journalist Natalie Burg dispels the popular misconception that the creative under-40 class is leaving Michigan as fast as it can.

Excerpt:

"Hi. I'm Natalie. I'm a self-employed writer, I'm 31, and, if you listen to the headlines, I don't exist. Like a centaur or a yeti, the well-educated, career-driven, creative-class Millennial like myself is not found in the wild here in Michigan. Supposedly, we've all left or are desperately attempting to do so.

Surprise! Not only am I a Michigander by choice (seriously, my husband is a musician; we could literally be anywhere), I get offended when people ask why we're "still here." I try to break it down as simply as I can for them: I know Michigan's challenges as well as anyone, but I love it here, and I know – not think,  know  – we're on our way back."

More here.

Michigan ranks 8th nationally in economic development success

Call Michigan the nation's comeback kid. Site Selection magazine just named it 8th best for job creation and economic development.

Excerpt:

"Michigan advanced eight spots in this year’s Competitiveness Awards, up from 16th in 2011.
The state's many business climate changes have resulted in other noteworthy improvements, including:
No. 1 for states that recovered most from the Great Recession.
No. 4 in the nation for most new corporate expansions or building projects in 2012.
Third most business-friendly tax ranking among the nation’s 12 largest states.
Third in the nation for high-tech growth."

More here.

Oakland County's job market is healthiest in years

This is the best it's been in years for job seekers in Oakland County, economists say. And the jobs pay well above the minimum wage.

Excerpt:

"On the heels of its strongest two-year job growth in almost 20 years, Oakland County's economy will add nearly 42,000 jobs through 2015, say University of Michigan economists...

In their annual forecast of the Oakland County economy, Fulton and colleague Don Grimes of the U-M Institute for Research on Labor, Employment, and the Economy say that high-wage industries—with average pay of more than $62,000—accounted for more than half of the new private-sector jobs created during the recovery, a trend that will continue throughout the forecast horizon...

Overall, Fulton and Grimes say that Oakland remains among the better local economies in the nation, ranking 10th among 36 comparable U.S. counties on a series of measures that indicate future economic prosperity."

More here.

68 Talent Articles | Page: | Show All
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